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The capital overlooks indigenous culture

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Sydney would never be the cultural capital of the country without a world-class national center for indigenous culture and arts (“Move to Melbourne: Sydney Pushes to Be the Cultural Capital of the Nation”). ”, 14 August). Infrastructure NSW He identified a National Indigenous Center as a priority in 2016, yet Indigenous peoples seeking to establish Indigenous Centers are still being ignored and sidelined.

The Aboriginal Cultural Center in Cutaway, Central Barangaroo has been turned down in favor of establishing a ‘premier event venue’. Another proposed center, the building identified as the Indigenous Cultural Center in the original Blackwattle Bay project, was inexplicably removed without comment in the revised plans now on display.

The local Aboriginal ancestors lived on and around the shores of Sydney Harbour. Both Barangaroo Central and Blackwattle Bay offer incredible opportunities to preserve and present some of the world’s oldest surviving cultures. Developed in consultation with Aboriginal people, staffed and managed by them, the place preserves cultural artifacts and promotes arts, dance, storytelling to all Australians and indeed the world. event. Adrian Tunnicliffe, Pyrmont

Sydney CBD already has a unique cultural icon: Ultimo’s Powerhouse Museum. Nothing in Melbourne or anywhere else comes close to matching this threatened gem. No need to redesign, rebrand or reimagine as a “fashion hub”. The building and the collections it houses are in perfect harmony. All that is required is adequate ongoing funding.With the money the New South Wales government is wasting on rebuilding Ultimo, Pyrmont Will he be able to build a high school on the Ultimo peninsula so there will be a school in the area? When A great museum for kids to hang out after school or on weekends. Linda Newton, Ultimo

No relief from climate disaster

confronted but grateful sun herald For public warning of the appalling fraud associated with disaster relief payments (“Emergency Relief Buckets Are Full of Holes,” Aug. 14). While it is certainly positive that the Commonwealth and Services Australia is detecting and investigating such frauds, we need to look at the underlying causes. First, reform of the disaster relief funding process is clearly needed. Second, adaptation is essential to protect vulnerable communities from the effects of natural disasters and minimize the need for disaster relief. Climate-related disasters are increasing in frequency and severity, as IPCC reports outline and Europe’s droughts, wildfires and heatwaves remind us. Our lands and communities are very fragile. Urgent and aggressive government support to adapt is essential. Amy Hiller, Cue (Vic)

familiar sounds

Those who know me know that I tend to weave song lyrics and titles into everyday conversation. You’ll probably wonder why the soundtrack of my life is recorded this way (“‘First DJ’ interviewed The Beatles for his tour of Australia.”, Aug. 14) ). But given that I grew up in a time when wireless was the link to the world as we knew it, Bob Rogers’ voice on the 2UE 950 got me into the Top 40. I remember walking from the primary in Gosford to Colette’s radio every Monday afternoon. Get the latest Top 40 charts in the store. This “disc jockey” was once just a wireless voice, but in 2022 he still puts another record in his machine and plays the soundtrack of my life. , was barely noticed many years ago. Alan Gibson, Cherrybrook

good call

Banning mobile phones during school hours is common knowledge and has long been awaited (“Schools Advised to Ban Phones,” Aug. 14). Smartphones keep students occupied and negatively affect their studies, social interactions, and outdoor activities. After the children are weaned from this addiction, we have to work on the adults.So we have more time to focus on our family and friends. Graham Lamb, North Rocks